Gut microbiota are important to overall health

High microbial diversity and richness correlate with positive health outcomes

Trillions of bacteria directly influence us

Our microbiome is the collection of all the microbes associated with our body, and it plays a major role in our health.

In our gut alone we have around 100 trillion microbes–the same number of cells we have in our entire body. Microbes train our immune system and help our bodies recognize friend from foe. Insulin resistance is associated with certain factors of the gut microbiome.

The bacteria that live in the gut and differ wildly from person to person play a role in how you uniquely respond to food. For people with diabetes, knowing how their

unique microbiome affects the digestion and absorption of food is important to effectively manage glucose levels. Since everybody’s microbiome is different, food choices impact each of us differently and directly affect diabetes management.

“Fundamental to the health of our body, is the health of our gut.” – Jack Gilbert, PhD UCSD

Scientific studies link microbiome to disease

  • Rapid advances in DNA sequencing and other tools are dramatically increasing access to the microbiome and links with disease
  • Time-series studies and multiple molecular perspectives are facilitating microbiome-wide association studies, which are analogous to genome-wide association studies
  • Early findings point to actionable outcomes of microbiome-wide association studies, although their clinical application has yet to be approved.

Personalizing diet based on the microbiome and additional clinical parameters

DayTwo built a model that more accurately predicts glycemic response for foods and food combinations than counting carbohydrates

The trillions of bacteria that live in the gut and differ wildly from person to person play a role in how you uniquely respond to food. DayTwo took the microbiome science and developed an algorithm with real people to predict individual response to food and food combinations based on personal data.