DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans https://www.daytwo.com/ Genomic Driven Personalized Meal Plans For Type 2 Diabetes & Glycemic Control Sun, 23 Jun 2019 19:00:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.1 https://www.daytwo.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/D2-favicon.png DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans https://www.daytwo.com/ 32 32 The Personal Nutrition Revolution that Diabetics Have Been Waiting For https://www.daytwo.com/nutrition/personal-nutrition-revolution-diabetics/ Mon, 11 Dec 2017 22:55:32 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=5971 The post The Personal Nutrition Revolution that Diabetics Have Been Waiting For appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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There’s no doubt that diabetes is the plague of the 21st century – some 25.8 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, about 8.3 percent of the population. However, breakthrough research led by scientists from the Weizmann Institute of Science is now being hailed around the world as the “big bang” moment in helping manage the disease- putting an end to generic diets and proving that health food to one person may be junk food to another.

37-year-old Karen from New York, explains what it’s like living with the disease in her family. “Diabetes is like an extra member of our family. There are three generations diabetics on both sides of my family – I feel like it’s just a matter of time before I am diagnosed, despite eating healthy, including a special diet from my doctor.”

Dr. Mariela Glandt an endocrinologist from the Glandt Center for Diabetes Care says that Karen is right to be anxious. “If Karen carries on taking generic nutritional advice, there is a very strong chance that she will also receive a diagnosis of diabetes which will be impossible to reverse.”

Recently the international scientific and medical community have been abuzz with the exciting research coming from Weizmann Institute of Science which is now in clinical trial at the Mayo Clinic. It proves that everyone reacts differently to the same food or food combination, and that the best way to keep one’s level of blood sugar balanced is to create personalized nutrition based on one’s individual gut bacteria and other personal parameters.

Foods that are perceived as healthy for everyone, such as rice, are not recommended for some people. In some cases, it turns out that foods like ice cream are not harmful.”

The study found that the food we put into our body meets our own unique gut bacteria which affects our own level of blood sugar, and that the results are different from person to person. Or, in simple English – eating a healthy breakfast of whole grain bread with low-fat cottage cheese and fruit is not necessarily what your body needs, and it could in fact be raising your blood sugar levels. And the twist is that the cup of espresso with the chocolate croissant could actually reduce your levels of blood sugar!

Lihi Segal, CEO of DayTwo, which took the findings of the professors’ revolutionary study one step further, says that “we developed the ultimate method to discover the deepest secret in our bodies – personalized nutrition.  We took science and technology and created a testing kit and personalized nutrition app which can translate your unique microbiome into personalized actionable nutritional insights, and maintain normalized blood sugar levels.

This unprecedented method allows the user to discover surprising food possibilities, while living life with smarter nutritional and activity choices.

The app provides you with food recommendations tailored to you and aimed at balancing your blood sugar levels.

The bottom line is that we are all aware that spikes in sugar levels can be detrimental to our body and is a large contributing factor for all the diseases in the modern age from diabetes and obesity to heart and vascular disease, and even cancer. But the good news is that there is finally a way to avoid these peaks in glucose levels through a simple but sophisticated tool that puts an end to generic diets and leads a new era for helping prevent and manage diabetes.

Order DayTwo

Note: Currently the product currently supports insulin-free type 2 diabetics and people over the age of 18.

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How to get through this Thanksgiving without feeling like a stuffed turkey https://www.daytwo.com/health/get-thanksgiving-without-feeling-like-stuffed-turkey/ Thu, 16 Nov 2017 18:30:29 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=5838 The post How to get through this Thanksgiving without feeling like a stuffed turkey appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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Two weeks ago in Chicago, DayTwo spent a few busy days at the Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo, FNCE (pronounced “fence-y”). It happened to be the 100th anniversary of FNCE and it was a great time to be there.

FNCE is the world’s largest gathering of food and nutrition experts, averaging around 10,000 attendees and over 130 sessions including culinary and yoga workshops.

While at our booth, we noticed a few trends that seemed to be prevalent throughout the conference.

Some of these trends included the following:
  • Added fibers and prebiotics to commonly consumed foods (like potato chips and bread)
  • Protein bars galore (and lot’s of free samples)
  • Developments in digital health, such as platforms for dietitians to record all their clients information and track their progress
  • Allergen (or food sensitivity) friendly foods including gluten free, FODMAP free, dairy free and peanut free
  • And our favorite – the microbiome!

We also met with many nutrition experts, including dietitians from private practices and hospitals, professors of nutrition and dietetics, diabetes educators, nutrition startups, supplement companies, and representatives of the American Diabetes Association. As part of our new Health Practitioner Program, we hosted a launch party to introduce our new initiative which includes incentivizing dietitians and healthcare professionals to refer patients with diabetes to DayTwo. We had a large variety of attendees from different backgrounds, with many relevant questions being asked around the area of the microbiome and future plans of DayTwo.

Any healthcare professional can visit our website and submit some basic information about his or her background and practice. After signing the partner agreement, they will have access to brochures, printable cards, a promotion code to give out to patients, as well as a practitioner report. The practitioner doesn’t need to hold any inventory, or purchase in advance.

Also in Chicago, DayTwo’s President Josh Stevens had the opportunity to be interviewed on Fox 32 News. He explained how DayTwo’s recommendations help people eat according to their microbiome in order to normalize blood sugar levels. He brought a few examples of his own personal recommendations including red wine and chocolate (lucky guy)!

See the full video interview here.

We are excited to see you next year in Washington #FNCE2018!

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DayTwo at the Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo https://www.daytwo.com/news/daytwo-food-nutrition-conference-expo/ Thu, 09 Nov 2017 20:17:07 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=5789 The post DayTwo at the Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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Two weeks ago in Chicago, DayTwo spent a few busy days at the Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo, FNCE (pronounced “fence-y”). It happened to be the 100th anniversary of FNCE and it was a great time to be there. FNCE is the world’s largest gathering of food and nutrition experts, averaging around 10,000 attendees and over 130 sessions including culinary and yoga workshops.

While at our booth, we noticed a few trends that seemed to be prevalent throughout the conference.

Some of these trends included the following:

  1. Added fibers and prebiotics to commonly consumed foods (like potato chips and bread) 
  2. Protein bars galore (and lot’s of free samples)
  3. Developments in digital health, such as platforms for dietitians to record all their clients information and track their progress
  4. Allergen (or food sensitivity) friendly foods including gluten free, FODMAP free, dairy free and peanut free
  5. And our favorite – the microbiome!

We also met with many nutrition experts, including dietitians from private practices and hospitals, professors of nutrition and dietetics, diabetes educators, nutrition startups, supplement companies, and representatives of the American Diabetes Association. As part of our new Health Practitioner Program, we hosted a launch party to introduce our new initiative which includes incentivizing dietitians and healthcare professionals to refer patients with diabetes to DayTwo. We had a large variety of attendees from different backgrounds, with many relevant questions being asked around the area of the microbiome and future plans of DayTwo.

Any healthcare professional can visit our website and submit some basic information about his or her background and practice. After signing the partner agreement, they will have access to brochures, printable cards, a promotion code to give out to patients, as well as a practitioner report. The practitioner doesn’t need to hold any inventory, or purchase in advance.

Also in Chicago, DayTwo’s President Josh Stevens had the opportunity to be interviewed on Fox 32 News. He explained how DayTwo’s recommendations help people eat according to their microbiome in order to normalize blood sugar levels. He brought a few examples of his own personal recommendations including red wine and chocolate (lucky guy)! 

See the full video interview here or watch below. 

We are excited to see you next year in Washington #FNCE2018!

The post DayTwo at the Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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Low-Carb Diet for Diabetes https://www.daytwo.com/health/low-carb-diet-diabetics/ Thu, 26 Oct 2017 13:57:33 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=5696 The post Low-Carb Diet for Diabetes appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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The Glandt Center for Diabetes Care, located in Tel Aviv, aims to help patients live optimal lives by managing their disease through medicine, diet, exercise, and more. The Center was started by Dr. Mariela Glandt, an endocrinologist specialist in diabetes, and is made up of a multi-disciplinary team all with the joint goal of providing the best care possible.

Unique to this clinic is the low-carb, high-fat diet given to diabetic patients in order to treat the condition and possibly reverse it.

In general, there are many studies (1,2,3,4) that support the low-carb diet for treatment of diabetes. Going back to the 1920’s, this was the standard treatment of care for diabetes before the discovery of insulin.

One study showed that a low-carb diet, followed for 6 months, lead to well-controlled diabetes more than 3 years later.

The American Diabetes Association make mention of low-carb diets in their Nutrition Therapy Recommendations for the Management of Adults with Diabetes.

Some highlights below:

  • It’s unclear how many carbohydrates people with diabetes should be consuming
  • The amount insulin and carbohydrates in the body are the biggest factors in affecting blood sugar response after meals
  • It’s important to track carbohydrate intake in achieving balanced sugar levels

It seems that amount of carbohydrates people with diabetes should be consuming needs to be individualized. Some studies suggest lower levels of carbohydrates (21g per day, up to 40% of total energy), while others lean towards a higher carbohydrate intake. It’s also important to monitor blood sugar levels before and after eating carbohydrates, and to think about the type of carbohydrate when calculating the ideal amount for individual intake.

DayTwo’s CEO Lihi Segal, along with Dr. Mariela Glandt, spoke with i24 News about low-carb diets and how disease can be influenced by our gut bacteria. Dr. Glandt talks about the difficulty her patients have following a low-carb diet, and about the potential collaboration with DayTwo in facilitating well-controlled diabetic diets. You can watch the interview here!

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Top 10 Low Sugar Fruits https://www.daytwo.com/health/top-10-low-sugar-fruits/ Tue, 17 Oct 2017 06:00:27 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=5662 The post Top 10 Low Sugar Fruits appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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Fruit is one of those great food groups – delicious, natural AND healthy. And if it’s healthy, you can totally eat as much you like. Right? Wrong.

Unfortunately, this concept doesn’t ever apply to any food or food group. While fruit is usually bursting with vitamins and minerals, it is also bursting with sugar – and over-consuming sugar can lead to all sorts of health problems like diabetes, obesity, tooth decay, hunger and low energy levels.

The American Heart Association recommends no more than 6 teaspoons (about 24 grams) of sugar per day for women, and 9 teaspoons (36 grams) per day for men. Some fruit can contain between 20 and 30 grams of sugar per serve. That’s a whole lotta sugar!

The good news is, there are some fruits out there that contain less sugar. Drumroll please…

And here they are: 10 Low Sugar Fruits!

  1. Berries: Blackberries, Strawberries, Raspberries and Blueberries are all low in sugar, containing between 5 grams – 15 grams of sugar per cup.
  2. Grapefruit: 8 grams of sugar in half a wedge of grapefruit. Try adding it to a salad, or eat it on it’s own to enjoy the citrusy flavor.
  3. Cantaloupe: Out of all the melons, cantaloupe contains the least amount of sugar with 8 grams of sugar in a large wedge.
  4. Lemon and Lime: These guys certainly aren’t your typically “sweet” fruit, but with only 1-1.5g of sugar per fruit, they’re a great addition to your glass of water.
  5. Rhubarb: Not something that you may immediately think of, however stewed rhubarb can be a delicious dessert, with only 1.3 grams of sugar in 1 cup of rhubarb.
  6. Guava: A low-sugar exception to the tropical fruit category, guava boasts a modest amount of 4.9 grams of sugar per fruit. A popular way to eat guava is by dipping it in salty sauces, you can eat the entire fruit including the rind.
  7. Cranberries: A less sweet option for a fruit, these guys are famous for being a natural treatment for UTIs. Half a cup of raw cranberries only contain 2.2 grams of sugar, but watch out for the more commonly consumed dried cranberries with added sugar.
  8. Apricots: An unlikely candidate, these fruit pack 3.2 grams of sugar in a small apricot. A great option for a fruit pie or crumble.
  9. Kiwifruit: These fuzzy fruits have a nice amount of Vitamin C and happen to be low in sugar, with only 6 grams of sugar per kiwi.
  10. Olives: Granted, they’re not your typical fruit but they contain 0g of sugar! So you might want to change your mind about them 🙂

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Prediabetes 101 https://www.daytwo.com/health/prediabetes-101/ Tue, 12 Sep 2017 05:37:37 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=5240 The post Prediabetes 101 appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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You may have heard a lot on the topic of diabetes. But what it’s younger cousin, prediabetes?

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 86 million Americans, or more than 1 out of 3 have prediabetes. That’s a pretty significant amount. Even more importantly, more than 70% of these people will develop diabetes type 2 in their lifetime. The unfortunate point here is: Only 11% of people with prediabetes actually know that they have it.

So let’s go over the basics:

What is prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a condition where blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Someone with prediabetes will experience insulin resistance, meaning the insulin will start to work less effectively in removing glucose from the blood to the cells to be used for energy. Once this happens, more insulin will be secreted to compensate. This stage of prediabetes can last many years.

What are the warning signs?

Unlike diabetes, prediabetes usually doesn’t  have any obvious signs or symptoms. In some cases, you might notice darkened skin on certain parts of the body like the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles (also known as acanthosis nigricans) and feeling more tired or thirsty,

How do I know if I have prediabetes?

Firstly, there are certain risk factors that make it more likely for you to develop prediabetes.

These include, a family history of type 2 diabetes, lack of physical activity, excess abdominal fat, smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, history of heart disease or stroke, gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy), polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and being from an Aboriginal, South Asian, Asian, African or Hispanic background.

The American Diabetes Association recommends blood glucose screening for adults should be at age 45, or sooner if you are overweight or have at least two risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

So what sort of tests will your doctor perform if you are at risk?

Diagnosis of prediabetes:

1) HbA1c between 5.7 – 6.4%. Also known as A1C, hemoglobin A1C, glycated hemoglobin and glycosylated hemoglobin test

This blood tests tells you what your average blood sugar levels are from the past 3 months. The higher the percentage in this test, the higher your blood sugar levels. If you have anemia, it isn’t relevant.

2) Fasting plasma glucose between 100-125 mg/dL.

This measures your blood glucose at a single point in time after fasting for at least 8 hours.

3) Oral glucose tolerance test (2 hours after drinking 75 grams of glucose) between 140-199mg/dL.

This measures your blood glucose after fasting, and then after drinking 75g of glucose. Your blood levels will be checked 1 hour and 2 hours after drinking the liquid. This isn’t usually performed.

What happens if you find out you do have prediabetes? How can you manage it and reduce the risk of developing diabetes? Read our blog post Six Steps to Take After Being Diagnosed with Prediabetes to get started in understanding the next steps to take.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Nutrition Myths and Facts #2 – Eggs will raise my cholesterol levels https://www.daytwo.com/health/nutrition-myths-facts-eggs-cholesterol-levels/ Wed, 16 Aug 2017 14:26:32 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=5234 The post Nutrition Myths and Facts #2 – Eggs will raise my cholesterol levels appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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What came first, the chicken or the egg? We may not be able to answer this question, but we can talk to you about cholesterol in eggs, and whether or not eating eggs will raise your cholesterol levels.

Let’s start with the basics.

Eggs contain cholesterol. In one large egg, you’ll find about 186 mg of cholesterol, all found in the egg yolk. Up until 2015, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommended to consume no more than 300 mg of cholesterol a day, or 200 mg if you are at risk of heart disease. However, in the more recent 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines the recommendations changed (as they tend to do) and instead suggested “Eat as little dietary cholesterol as possible, but there are no specific limits.”

What was the reason for this change of heart?

Research has shown that dietary cholesterol itself isn’t necessarily the bad guy and surprisingly has a minimal effect on blood cholesterol. Cholesterol is is found in animal based foods (think beef, chicken, seafood, dairy), and is naturally produced by your body. We need cholesterol to help build cells and produce hormones. Cholesterol is produced in the liver and intestines from fats, sugars and proteins. Most healthy people can eat up to seven eggs a week with no increased risk of heart disease. A review looking at various studies on the the effect of no-egg consumption versus a moderate egg consumption, did not find that completely limiting cholesterol consumption was of a benefit.

So if cholesterol isn’t the enemy, what is?

Eating large amounts of saturated fat and trans fats can cause your liver to pump out too much “bad” cholesterol, also known as LDL cholesterol. This type of cholesterol can clog up your arteries and increase your risk of heart disease. Because of this, health professionals will usually recommend limiting saturated fat to 10 percent or less of your total calorie intake, and avoiding trans fat. Sugars have also been shown to have a negative effect on cholesterol and increased risk of heart disease. Recommendations from the American Heart Association include consuming no more than 6 teaspoons (or 100 calories) of added sugar for women, and 9 teaspoons or 150 calories for men. To translate this into food terms, 1 cup of coke has around 6 teaspoons of sugar! Read more about sugar on one of our previous blog posts.

Let’s return back to our friend, the egg.

I like to label eggs, a “pocket of nutrients”. They are one of the most simplest foods, but jammed packed with a truckload of essential nutrients. There are studies that show links between regular egg consumption and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and lowering blood pressure. So it seems it would be unwise to cut something pretty beneficial out of your diet on the premise that it may raise your cholesterol levels. That being said, moderation is always the key, especially when it comes to mixed and ever-changing messages.

If you enjoy eggs on toast a few times a week, there is no need to banish it from your diet. That being said, don’t go whipping up a 3-egg omelet on a daily basis.

If you are looking for ways to lower cholesterol you can try ramping up on exercise (aim for 150 minutes a week), increasing dietary fiber (around 25-30 grams a day), eat more of the healthy fats (nuts, olive oil, oily fish), avoiding trans fat and limiting saturated fat.

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6 Steps to Take After Being Diagnosed with Prediabetes https://www.daytwo.com/health/six-steps-take-diagnosed-prediabetes/ Tue, 15 Aug 2017 13:48:42 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=5236 The post 6 Steps to Take After Being Diagnosed with Prediabetes appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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So you have been diagnosed with prediabetes. What are your next steps?

First, don’t panic. This doesn’t mean that you will definitely get diabetes. While 70%  of people with prediabetes will go onto develop diabetes, that still leaves 30% of people that do not.

Once you’ve understood that this is a manageable condition, you can start thinking about what to do.

1. Start moving

Exercise is really one of the best forms of medicine. Aim for minimum of 150 minutes a week of anything you enjoy that gets your heart rate up (dancing, swimming, walking, sport). This can be divided into 30 minutes 5 times a week, or 45 minutes 3-4 times a week. If you find this overwhelming, it’s always a good idea to start small: Aim for once a week and slowly build up.

2. Visit your Doc

Sounds obvious – but this is a really an essential part of managing your prediabetes. By visiting your doctor frequently (every 3-6 months) and checking your glucose and HbA1c levels you can keep track of your situation. This provides you with some sort of tangible goal and ensures that you will have someone to report back to, whether it’s for positive reinforcement or helping you get back on track.

3. Change your eating habits

Achieving balanced sugar levels is strongly associated with what you eat. Personalized nutrition will really help you figure out which foods will raise your blood sugars, and which foods will raise them less. For some people adding fat to their meal will improve their glucose response, and for others it might be adding a high protein food like chicken or fish. Other things to take into consideration is to pile your plate with non-starchy vegetables (think spinach, peppers, mushrooms), don’t over do it on the fruit and make sure you get enough fiber from foods like fruit, veg, nuts, beans, legumes and whole grains. Avoid sugary drinks, and try to eat foods in their natural form.

4. Lose some weight and keep it off

Making dietary changes and moving more will help with this. You don’t necessarily need to lose kilos of weight, even 5-7% of your body weight can reduce your chance of getting diabetes.

5. Stick with your habits

When it comes to behavior change – whether it is health related, or anything related, it is important to commit to the change before taking any action. This means being realistic and being aware of the difficulties that may arise, and thinking about how you can overcome them or continue to try your best even if you fall of the band-wagon now and again. Making sure you have support from your family and friends or health professional will help you with sticking to these changes. Setting clear goals and rewarding yourself for achieving these goals are also important at this stage. Remember it takes at least 12 weeks in order for behavior change to become more of a habit so give yourself some time to get used to these changes.

6. And our favorite – sleep 🙂

Sleep is one of those things that often gets forgotten about when making changes to your health. However, not sleeping enough can make it harder to lose weight and more difficult for your body to use insulin effectively. Try going to bed and waking up at the same time every day and night. Relax before going to sleep and avoid using your screen half an hour before bedtime.

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Nutrition Myths and Facts Series – Part 1: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day https://www.daytwo.com/health/nutrition-myths-facts-series-part-1-breakfast-important-meal-day/ Wed, 05 Jul 2017 03:46:11 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=5110 The post Nutrition Myths and Facts Series – Part 1: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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Background:

The age-old adage, “Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dinner like a pauper” may sound somewhat familiar. It’s something that has been drilled into us throughout our childhood, that skipping breakfast can cause you damage. Benefits of this morning meal apparently include boosting your metabolism, reducing hunger throughout the day, providing you with important nutrients that you may not get otherwise and helping with concentration.

Interestingly, before this notion came about, breakfast wasn’t a particularly important meal. People didn’t have specific “breakfast” foods, and ate whatever was lying around or leftovers from dinner the night before. Our ancestors ate a small meal and ate the larger meal when it was more convenient during their farm work. The line “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day” was invented in the 19th century by Seventh Day Adventists James Caleb Jackson and John Harvey Kellogg to sell their newly invented breakfast cereal. After that, the bacon food industry jumped on the bandwagon and convinced people about the importance of eating protein in the morning.

So, how important is breakfast really?

As we often like to answer, and not only on the topic of nutrition: it really depends on you. Part of the problem of studies that have been done regarding breakfast consumption and obesity, is that they are association studies. This means that while they may show an association between breakfast and weight maintenance or other health parameters, they do not imply causation. There are also biases that may have occurred like, people that eat breakfast might be more health-conscious because they are following the “eat breakfast is healthy” dogma.

In the last few years, a number of researchers have attempted to answer the question, “does breakfast cause weight loss?” through randomized controlled trials.

What did they find out?

In a long-term study, done in 2014, 309 obese adult participants were randomized to a no-breakfast group and breakfast group for 16 weeks. They found that  “this had no discernable effect on weight loss in free-living adults who were attempting to lose weight.”

This was done after smaller studies, that found skipping breakfast did not result in consuming more energy-dense meals later on in the day, and may have even reduced energy consumption.

So, I should skip breakfast?

The answer to this, is really two things:

  1. The quality of your breakfast is a lot more important than the act of eating it all together. Using your personalized nutrition recommendations can really help you figure out what kind of breakfast foods are good for you.
  2. Listen to your body. If you feel good when you skip breakfast, and find you snack less during the day and feel energetic, there is no need to force yourself to eat breakfast. On the other hand, if you look forward to breakfast and find it helps you to control your weight and appetite – then stick with it.

In this series, we will try to break down nutrition myths (or facts) and find out the truth behind them.

Do you eat or skip breakfast?

Is this a habit, or something you think to be healthy?

What sort of breakfasts do you like to eat?

Watch this space for a fun breakfast recipe (if you do choose to eat breakfast) coming your way!

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What Bread is Healthier: White or Whole Wheat? https://www.daytwo.com/nutrition/what-bread-is-healthier-white-whole-wheat/ Sat, 10 Jun 2017 23:18:47 +0000 https://www.daytwo.com/?p=4915 The post What Bread is Healthier: White or Whole Wheat? appeared first on DAYTWO | Glycemic Control | Type 2 Diabetes Treatment | Nutrigenetic & Personalized Meal Plans.

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Wonder bread.   Whole-wheat.  Gluten-free.  Sourdough.  Which is healthiest?   

It depends.  On your gut microbiome.

A new study published this month in Cell Metabolism and co-authored by DayTwo’s founders and Weizmann Institute Scientists Eran Segal and Eran Elinav, report the results of a comprehensive, randomized trial comparing differences in how processed white bread and artisanal whole-wheat sourdough affect the body.

The study included 20 participants, all of whom normally consumed about 10% of their calories from bread. Half were assigned to consume an increased amount of processed, packaged white bread for a week—around 25% of their calories—and half to consume an increased amount of whole-wheat sourdough, which was baked especially for the study and delivered fresh to the participants. After a two-week washout period, the diets for the two groups were reversed.

Before the study and throughout study duration, participants’ health effects were monitored, including wakeup glucose levels; levels of calcium, iron, and magnesium; fat and cholesterol levels; kidney and liver enzymes; and several markers for inflammation and tissue damage.

The study also measured the makeup of the participants’ microbiomes before, during, and after the study.

“The initial finding, and this was very much contrary to our expectation, was that there were no clinically significant differences between the effects of these two types of bread on any of the parameters that we measured,” says Eran Segal, a computational biologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science and one of the study’s senior authors. “We looked at a number of markers, and there was no measurable difference in the effect that this type of dietary intervention had.”

Based on some of their earlier work, however, which found that different people have different glycemic responses to the same diet, the investigators suspected that something more complicated may be going on: Perhaps some of the people in the study were responding better to one type of bread, and some to the other. A closer look indicated that this was indeed the case. About half the people had a better response to the processed, white-flour bread, and the other half had a better response to the whole-wheat sourdough. The lack of differences were only seen when all findings were averaged together.

“The findings for this study are not only fascinating but potentially very important, because they point toward a new paradigm: Different people react differently even to the same foods,” says Eran Elinav, a researcher in the Department of Immunology at the Weizmann Institute and another of the study’s senior authors. “To date, the nutritional values assigned to food have been based on minimal science, and one-size-fits-all diets have failed miserably.”

He adds: “These findings could lead to a more rational approach for telling people which foods are a better fit for them, based on their microbiomes.”

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